Publications

Two New Septuagint Resources to Know About (Actually, Three)

If you’re in the biblical studies world — whether as a student or a scholar — you likely know that the annual conferences are fast approaching. Next week the ETS/IBR/SBL trio of events will be held in San Diego, California. It should be a great time of collaboration and camaraderie (with the occasional snarky comment if we’re all honest). If you are new, either to this blog or to the conferences, you might want to check out my posts from a few years back on conference-going strategy (Part 1 and Part 2).

I thought I’d draw attention to two new resources related to the Septuagint that will be available for purchase at the conferences. Both are very user-friendly and oriented towards students and learners. Be sure to look for these two publishers in the book room and check out these resources. (Actually, there is a third I’ll mention as well . . . ) (more…)

New Article on Psalm 51 in JSOT

I am pleased to see a new article of mine published in the current issue of the Journal for the Study of the Old Testament. The article is entitled “David’s spiritual walls and conceptual blending in Psalm 51” and the abstract is as follows:

Owing to the apparent topical disjunction of the final two verses of Psalm 51, many commentators consider them a later addition, particularly given the attitude toward sacrifice and the reference to Jerusalem’s walls. By taking a cognitive linguistic approach, particularly applying Fauconnier and Turner’s theory of conceptual blending, this article demonstrates the unity of the Psalm as a discourse unit. Additionally, this article builds upon literary structural analyses of others to suggest the complementarity of the cognitive linguistic and literary approaches. This analysis of Psalm 51 as a whole demonstrates that, not only do vv. 20–21 cohere with the entire psalm, they do so by interacting with vv. 18–19 to build meaning from a single conceptual blend network, one that depends upon the conceptual structures prompted by the narrative setting throughout the discourse. On this reading, David himself is Zion/Jerusalem whose damaged spiritual walls require restoration by Yhwh as a builder.

I am afraid I cannot post the actual published version due to the ridiculous copyright practices of academic journals. But I can break down some of the jargon a little bit and give away the punchline.

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A Sneak Preview of the Printed Volumes

Here’s a peek at what the physical copies of the Septuagint reader’s edition that I co-edited with Greg Lanier will look like – can’t wait to see one in person myself!

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

This was just posted by Hendrickson, who is running a fantastic pre-order sale on the hardbound edition ($65!). This is our first view of the actual printed volumes, showing the spines and packaging materials. Very exciting!

Two Volume View

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