Literature

John Meade’s New Edition of the Hexaplaric Evidence for Job

I am very pleased to have had the chance to sit down with my friend Dr. John Meade (at a socially responsible virtual distance of course) to discuss the recent publication of his new book, A Critical Edition of the Hexaplaric Fragments of Job 22-42 (Peeters). John is an associate professor of Old Testament at Phoenix Seminary, where he also serves as co-director with Dr. Peter Gurry of the Text & Canon Institute. (As a side note, the T&CI is up to some fascinating things, such as their recent Sacred Words conference.) (more…)

Top 10 Books of 2019 (and all the others)

As a professor, it probably comes as no surprise that I enjoy reading. It kind of comes with the territory. Then again, maybe some who read this post will be surprised at the somewhat random nature of the things I do read once you have a look below. There is a reason for that.

In my college and graduate years, I rarely read for pleasure. I simply didn’t think I had the time, so I focused on going deep with my assigned reading. There was nothing inherently wrong with that and, to be sure, I learned a lot with that approach. But I also missed out on a lot, since it is absolutely not the case that I (or you) don’t have the time for pleasure reading. Thankfully, I realized that early on in my doctoral years. That’s when I rediscovered my love of reading broadly — and as my whims led (as Alan Jacobs commends), which is what I make a practice of doing now. I find non-work-related reading particularly life giving, although admittedly there are some fuzzy boundaries with some books. (more…)

Two New Septuagint Resources to Know About (Actually, Three)

If you’re in the biblical studies world — whether as a student or a scholar — you likely know that the annual conferences are fast approaching. Next week the ETS/IBR/SBL trio of events will be held in San Diego, California. It should be a great time of collaboration and camaraderie (with the occasional snarky comment if we’re all honest). If you are new, either to this blog or to the conferences, you might want to check out my posts from a few years back on conference-going strategy (Part 1 and Part 2).

I thought I’d draw attention to two new resources related to the Septuagint that will be available for purchase at the conferences. Both are very user-friendly and oriented towards students and learners. Be sure to look for these two publishers in the book room and check out these resources. (Actually, there is a third I’ll mention as well . . . ) (more…)