How Did We Go About Handling the LXX Double-Texts?

More information about our forthcoming Reader’s Edition of the Septuagint.

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

EstherTobitS

As is well known in the field of Septuagint studies, certain books developed over time into distinct textual forms. That is, in some cases there are what look like two different Greek versions of the same book in the Septuagint corpus. In such cases, the manuscript evidence preserves two textual traditions that are substantially different enough that Rahlfs decided to differentiate them in his edition of the Septuagint.* Since we decided to use Rahlfs-Hanhart as a base text, when it came to producing the Reader’s Edition we had to ask ourselves how we would handle these “double texts,” as they are often called.

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Stellenbosch Symposium on the Theology of the Septuagint

[Schedule Updated 14 August]

There is a great reason to travel to South Africa for those interested in the Septuagint. The Universities of Rostock and Stellenbosch are joining forces to host a symposium entitled “A Theology of the Septuagint.”

The event will be held from 17 to 19 August 2018 in the Department of Ancient Studies at Stellenbosch University. I am told that this symposium is not open to paper proposals, however delegates are welcome. (more…)

What Vocab is Provided? An Explanation and Sample Text

Over at our blog Septuaginta, I put together some information about what vocabulary we provided in the apparatus of our reader’s edition. Plus if you stick with it you’ll find a sample text from Exodus at the bottom of the post.

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

Probably the most obvious question to ask about a reader’s edition is “What vocabulary do you provide?” After all, that is the basic function of this kind of book—to supply the reader with guidance on the form and meaning of difficult vocabulary.

So obviously that’s what we did.

But how did we define “difficult vocabulary” for Septuaginta? It was actually a pretty tricky issue to address. Let me explain.

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