Old Testament Studies

Review: Jonathan Kline’s “A Proverb A Day In Biblical Hebrew”

Having recently co-edited the Reader’s Edition of the Septuagint, it probably comes as no surprise that I am an advocate of well-produced texts to cultivate learning and appreciation of the biblical languages. So I was excited to see yet another volume from Jonathan Kline suited for that very purpose. Kline has already put together a series of biblical language books that I recommend to students. And this new book, A Proverb A Day In Biblical Hebrew (Hendrickson 2019) is yet another excellent resource to help keep students, pastors, and scholars in the Hebrew text. (more…)

Modular Fall Course on Septuagint Genesis at TWU (Fall 2019)

Students interested in the Septuagint know how difficult it can be to find reliable guides to get familiar with the field. Books are one thing. But nothing quite substitutes for in-class instruction. That is one reason I am so glad that the fine scholars at the John William Wevers Institute for Septuagint Studies at Trinity Western University (Langley, BC) are stepping into the gap in North America. (more…)

New Article on Psalm 51 in JSOT

I am pleased to see a new article of mine published in the current issue of the Journal for the Study of the Old Testament. The article is entitled “David’s spiritual walls and conceptual blending in Psalm 51” and the abstract is as follows:

Owing to the apparent topical disjunction of the final two verses of Psalm 51, many commentators consider them a later addition, particularly given the attitude toward sacrifice and the reference to Jerusalem’s walls. By taking a cognitive linguistic approach, particularly applying Fauconnier and Turner’s theory of conceptual blending, this article demonstrates the unity of the Psalm as a discourse unit. Additionally, this article builds upon literary structural analyses of others to suggest the complementarity of the cognitive linguistic and literary approaches. This analysis of Psalm 51 as a whole demonstrates that, not only do vv. 20–21 cohere with the entire psalm, they do so by interacting with vv. 18–19 to build meaning from a single conceptual blend network, one that depends upon the conceptual structures prompted by the narrative setting throughout the discourse. On this reading, David himself is Zion/Jerusalem whose damaged spiritual walls require restoration by Yhwh as a builder.

I am afraid I cannot post the actual published version due to the ridiculous copyright practices of academic journals. But I can break down some of the jargon a little bit and give away the punchline.

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